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Butterflies, Moths and Skippers of North America


Moths and Butterflies belong to the insect group lepidoptera and includes the related 'skipper' family as well.

Butterflies (and the related 'Skippers') are the quintessential summertime insect across North America, representing 760 complete species while a full 12,000 are known to roam North America and some 165,000 have been categorized worldwide. Moths are similar creatures and their differences abound but all of these insects fall under the encompassing order name of Lepidoptera. Similarities between Butterflies and Moths include their scale-like hairs that cover their respective bodies and deliver their various recognizable patterns and colors along the wings that we see. Nearly all species have a long, coiled tongue known as a proboscis which allows them to suck nectar and pollen (among other food sources depending on species). Why are Butterflies and Moths grouped together on this page? Because they are scientifically categorized under the same Kingdom, Phylum, Class and Order and very closely related to one another.

There are a total of (84) Butterflies, Moths and Skippers of North America in the ButterflyIdentification.org database. Consider contributing an image at the email address showcased at the bottom of this page.



User Tip
Click on the red "X" icons in the panels below to remove bugs that do not match your specimen. Note that each panel is numbered for your reference.